Chad Nguyen, CHADDIE

Chad Nguyen of CHADDIE may be pegged as one to watch by the Australian fashion media, but this savvy designer recognises that in order to succeed in the long run, he has to keep those creative wheels turning.

CHAD NGUYEN, CHADDIE | Behind the Seams | Travelshopa

Chad grew up in Ho Chi Minh City, before moving to Sydney four years ago to pursue his studies in Fashion Design at the Raffles College of Design and Commerce. You could say fashion runs in the blood. Chad’s grandfather was a tailor; his mum was the owner of a fashion boutique and his dad was constantly tinkering with fabrics and textiles, even jewellery. Quite the fashionable family we’d admit, and yet, Chad held absolute fashion authority in the family, picking out items of clothing and accessories for his mother and sisters.

Realising his affinity for fashion, Chad started his eponymous label, CHADDIE in his second year of college, releasing a small capsule sportswear collection that sold out in-store. During his senior year, CHADDIE was chosen as one of seven to showcase at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia 2016 (MBFW 2016) in May.

We already see glimpses of a world-ready designer in Chaddie’s blend of flattering and feminine pieces. There’s a comforting sense of the classic, interlaced with a chic, modern and playful spirit — perhaps qualities of the women he draws inspiration from.
We chat to Chad about women as his muse and the highs and lows of being a new designer.

First off, congratulations on your Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week debut! Could you tell us more about your experience?

It was absolutely exciting and I still remember the vibe. I was preparing for my graduation showcase at the Raffles College Graduate Show in December 2015, and just one week before the show, my professor told me I had been selected to present my debut collection at MBFWA 2016.

After the graduate showcase was over, Marie Claire Australia posted a photo of my creations on Instagram and I knew it was the right time for me to start bringing CHADDIE to a serious level. I was working on the collection for three months, and the experience was extremely hectic.

From conceptualisation, sketching, fabrication and pattern-making to manufacturing, photo shoots and PR plans…it was all so real and one day I woke up and it hit me. I asked myself: “Am I actually one of the Australian-based fashion designers now? Am I really going to debut my first collection in a few months?” The moment I saw my name amongst all the big fashion houses and senior designers such as Dion Lee, Ellery and Toni Maticevski, I knew that all my hard work would eventually get me somewhere. I just gotta keep working hard everyday.

What has the experience taught you?

Be patient, be kind, be passionate and stay positive. Find the fun in everything that you’re going through.

What was the inspiration behind your latest Cruise ’16 Collection?

Cruise ’16 was a celebration of women. The 10 looks represented 10 different personalities and attitudes that women possess, expressed through a variety of style and silhouette. The colourway was strongly inspired by a certain mood — each one defines a specific female character. I’d envision where she’d go, how she looks like, what’s her motivation, her passion and her sense of lifestyle.

I have been surrounded by women all my life — my mother, my sisters, my best friend. I observe my mom in her gold silk pajamas, looking stylish but still feeling comfortable, or my sister wearing that funky striped trench coat to work. Everyone has inspired me so much in this collection. I want to create a collection that every female can see herself in it and relate to.

Chad Nguyen, Chaddie | Behind the Seams | Travelshopa
Chad Nguyen, Chaddie | Behind the Seams | Travelshopa

Can you tell us a bit about your creative and design process? How does a collection typically start to form?

First, I would start with an idea or concept. I identify the sort of things I want to look into. It could be an artwork, an artist or a selection of music, colour or texture. I love to be inspired by the street. I usually take my sketchbook with me around the city, paying close attention to people, architecture and my surroundings.

A busy morning at the train station or lady holding a coffee in her hand while rushing to work could easily inspire me. I would be like “Hmm, if her shirt cuffs were a little longer and sturdier, they would be so striking”. Simple things in life inspire me.

What does a typical day of work involve for you?

At the moment, I’m quite busy with the FW 2017 collection, which will be showcased at Vietnam Designer Fashion Week, an event that’s held in my hometown. I start the day designing, putting pieces and details together, and playing around with fabrics and textiles for the remainder of the day. I hardly stop for lunch, usually slipping bites in between emails, editing my website or posting updates on Instagram. For me, it’s all about fashion.

What are some of the greatest challenges you’ve faced since starting and running CHADDIE?

Keeping the brand on the run! I’ve tried my best to avoid blank space. I got to keep my brand going, that’s why media works are important too as I’ll need to keep my brand interesting with new editorials, streetstyle photos, news… CHADDIE has only been launched in Sydney since May 2016 and going to be launched in Vietnam in November 2016, the brand is still new and fresh and I have to keep it going.

I have been surrounded by women all my life — my mother, my sisters, my best friend. I observe my mom in her gold silk pajamas, looking stylish but still feeling comfortable, or my sister wearing that funky striped trench coat to work. Everyone has inspired me so much in this collection. I want to create a collection that every female can see herself in it and relate to.

How have your Vietnamese roots contributed towards your unique sensibility towards fashion?

The fashion industry in Vietnam is growing rapidly. The buyers and customers in Vietnam go crazy for big houses like Chanel or Dior but a great thing about them is that they also love wearing local designers. There are many Vietnamese designers that are dedicated and possess great fashion instincts and they’re doing really well there. As a Vietnamese currently living in Sydney, I like the fact that I get to have that cultural knowledge and awareness and apply it to my work. In one of my designs from the Cruise ’16 collection, you can sense a low-key inspiration that came from the Ao Dai — a traditional Vietnamese garment. I love Vietnam. I’m proud of where I came from and I love to celebrate it.

How have your Vietnamese roots contributed towards your unique sensibility towards fashion?

The fashion industry in Vietnam is growing rapidly. The buyers and customers in Vietnam go crazy for big houses like Chanel or Dior but a great thing about them is that they also love wearing local designers. There are many Vietnamese designers that are dedicated and possess great fashion instincts and they’re doing really well there. As a Vietnamese currently living in Sydney, I like the fact that I get to have that cultural knowledge and awareness and apply it to my work. In one of my designs from the Cruise ’16 collection, you can sense a low-key inspiration that came from the Ao Dai — a traditional Vietnamese garment. I love Vietnam. I’m proud of where I came from and I love to celebrate it.

Chad Nguyen, Chaddie | Behind the Seams | Travelshopa
Chad Nguyen, Chaddie | Behind the Seams | Travelshopa
Chad Nguyen, Chaddie | Behind the Seams | Travelshopa

How does it feel to have garnered some measure of industry support so early on in your career?

It’s just unbelievable. I will never forget the feeling. For such a new and young designer like myself who just graduated a few months ago, it is such an honor and I couldn’t be more grateful.

What changes would you like to see in future fashion weeks? Do you feel there is enough industry support for new design talent?

I genuinely feel there’s been strong support for emerging designers. It’s not just the industry but I also think the designers should be the ones to chase the opportunities. For me, I believe that success won’t come if you sit and wait for it…you have to chase it and grab it. Of course, if you’re hardworking and talented, I believe the effort will pay off.

What advice do you have for budding designers with global ambitions or anybody involved in creative work?

I think I should be the one to ask for advice (laughs). I mean, all of us emerging designers, we have to really enjoy what we’re doing and keep up the hard work. You won’t become a star overnight but as long as you believe in yourself and do your best, opportunity will present itself and that will be up to you if you’re going to take it or leave it. Also, when it comes to designing, [always try to] break out of the box.

Who are some of the designers and creatives who you think are doing great work?

I love Christopher Kane and Raf Simons. Their work inspires me so much. I do enjoy the work of Stella McCartney and Louis Vuitton too.

What are you working on now and what are you looking forward to in the near future?

I’m currently working on my upcoming FW17 collection which will be showcased at Vietnam Designer Fashion Week 2017 this November, and alongside that I’m finding stockists for the Cruise ’16 collection, I’m opening a Pop Up Showroom this November in Vietnam and I can’t wait to launch my Cruise ’16 collection there and also present my upcoming pieces from FW17.

Chad Nguyen, Chaddie | Behind the Seams | Travelshopa

Rio: The Stylish Olympics

Rio: The Stylish Olympics | 5 Minutes With | Travelshopa

In recent Olympiads, The Olympic Games have treated us to Olympic style, both on and off the field; namely the Parade of Nations has turned into something of a runway.

We recently explored the activewear (or athleisure) movement and how it’s so much more than a trend. As expected, Rio 2016 marks the culmination of the athleisure movement, with enough prominent fashion designers and brands on board to rival fashion week. Designer fashion’s tryst with athletic wear comes to a head with big names such as Ralph Lauren, Stella McCartney and DSquared2 lending sartorial flair to the competitions and Olympic fanfare.

Curious about the style stakes at the Rio 2016? Here’s the fashion primer on everything you need to know about Rio: The Stylish Olympics.

 


 

Australia

Sportscraft

Team Australia gets our vote for the most polished, with their preppy ensemble of green-and-white pinstriped schoolboy blazers with dark green contrast piping, white shorts for the men and white skirts for the women, finished with gold scarf or tie. While the collegiate air is hard to brush off, we’re able to sympathise with the strict green and gold colour code, which can be difficult to work with. Designed by fashion retailer, Sportscraft, the uniforms also pay homage to past gold medallists with jacket linings that have been inked with the names of all 107 medal winners. Now that’s one robe of honour we’ll like to have in our trophy cabinet.

Rio: The Stylish Olympics | 5 Minutes With | Travelshopa

 

Canada

DSquared2 | Hudson’s Bay

Team Canada makes sartorial headlines this year for displaying an audacious collection that marries couture with the prevailing athleisure trend. Designed by Dan and Dean Caten of Canadian brand Dsquared2, the Canadian uniform is a fashion-forward evolution of athletic wear, bordering on tailored formal dress. Red, single-breasted nylon blazers with high-low hemlines and vertical zipper breast pockets are matched with slim wool-blend trousers. Rendered in patriotic red and white, the backs of the jackets and sweatshirts are emblazoned with large maple leaf graphic emblems. Ever since Hudson’s Bay took over as the official outfitter of Team Canada in 2013, it has garnered plenty of flak. We have a feeling this one is going to be a win.

Rio: The Stylish Olympics | 5 Minutes With | Travelshopa

 

France

Lacoste

A sportswear empire built by tennis great Rene Lacoste, Lacoste is the natural choice outfitter for the French Olympic team. Team France unveiled an ensemble of white hooded ponchos, zip-up polo shirts, navy blue trench coats paired with white ankle-grazing trousers and white tennis shoes — a utilitarian chic look that’s every bit as effortless as the French. The uniform doesn’t veer very far from your conventional street-infused sportswear except for one surprise touch — the signature crocodile logo embroidered in the tricolour stripes of the national flag.

Rio: The Stylish Olympics | 5 Minutes With | Travelshopa

 

Sweden

H&M

Sweden’s most well-known fashion export gains a second title as the nation’s official Olympic outfitter. The Olympic uniforms designed by H&M are decked in blue and gold, an ode to Sweden’s national flag. The Swedish fast fashion retailer has also factored eco-consciousness and sustainability concerns into the garments’ production — resulting in opening ceremony uniforms, high-performance competition pieces and podium outfits fashioned from recycled polyester. Of course, it wouldn’t be fast fashion without a retail spin-off. Team Sweden supporters and Olympic buffs can get their hands on an Olympic-inspired consumer range which includes leggings, windbreakers and sports bras in a muted palette of blacks, greys and dusty pinks.

Rio: The Stylish Olympics | 5 Minutes With | Travelshopa

 

United Kingdom

Stella McCartney | Adidas

Stella McCartney once again partnered with German sportswear retailer Adidas to fashion the look of Team Great Britain’s competitive gear. Forgoing 2012’s minimal approach, Team GB’s 2016 Olympics kit threw the focus instead on bold logos and a custom-designed coat of arms. The motif is an amalgamation of key British iconography: the United Kingdom’s national flowers (the rose, thistle, leek and flax each representing the four home nations) appear alongside three lions bearing Olympic torches, topped with a crown of gold, silver and bronze medals. At the bottom, Latin script reads: “conjoined in one”. The symbolic coat of arms is plastered across cropped tops, cycling jerseys and zip-up sports jackets alike, forming the common thread that binds the aspirations of Team GB.

Rio: The Stylish Olympics | 5 Minutes With | Travelshopa

 

U.S.A.

Polo Ralph Lauren

What Ralph Lauren lacks in terms of innovation, it sure makes up for with consistency. The heritage brand has been the official outfitter for Team USA since 2008. For many years, Ralph Lauren has stood at the podium of American fashion, the proud symbol of the All-American classic. Its 2016 Summer Olympic collection bears many of the same recognisable characteristics. Think crisp white bottoms, button-down polo shirts, striped belts and boat shoes emblazoned with patriotic flourishes such as the large USA print on the back in the requisite red, white and blue. While prepster may not exactly ooze athleticism, we can’t deny that this is America as the world best knows it. It won’t be difficult to spot Team USA at the Games’ Opening Ceremony either: It’s been revealed that the flag bearer will don a jacket fitted with glowing electroluminescent panels.

Rio: The Stylish Olympics | 5 Minutes With | Travelshopa

 

Kelly Wearstler, Kelly Wearstler

Kelly Wearstler, Designer | Interview | Travelshopa

The name Kelly Wearstler reverberates throughout the interior design sphere. Wearstler, whose magnificent oeuvre spans residential and commercial interior projects, luxury furniture designs, high end home accessories and fashion collections, holds court as Los Angeles’s most well-known interior designer. Since establishing Kelly Wearstler Interior Design in 1995, Wearstler has built a shimmering empire of lifestyle projects — from designing The Avalon Hotel to applying her unique design touch to global brands across the luxury market space. We probe the designer to get at the heart of her inimitable style.

Kelly Wearstler’s decorative instincts recall the theatrical grandeur and unbridled excesses of Hollywood’s Golden Age, but she is equally adept at mixing diverse periods of furniture to arrive at a scintillating style that’s all her own. All inhibitions are cast off in the wind — proportions and scale get flipped and rotated, and different textures are knitted together to form an intriguing tapestry. “The harmony of masculine and feminine, classic and contemporary, high and low” is central to Wearstler’s design philosophy. Wearstler is also known to exult in colour. Pink, turquoise, ochre, cinnamon, mauve, metallic and tiger stripes….no shade or pattern is too bold for her taste. Tables laid with sculptures and objets d’ art, and accoutrements paved with gemstones and brass evoke a rich layered landscape.

Originally from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Wearstler’s small town roots have no bearing on her vaulting, maximalist imagination. Gifted with a keen eye for design, she studied interior and graphic design at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston before graduating to an apprenticeship under legendary graphic design icon, Milton Glaser.

Where did your appreciation for interior design begin?

I have always been drawn to design. My mother was a designer and she took me to antique shows and auctions as a girl, educating my eye from a young age. I’ve always been very curious and was never without my sketch book. Interior design combines so many of my passions – architecture, art history, sculpture, pattern, texture, light and movement. It’s truly my dream job.

Could you describe your aesthetic in your own words?

My aesthetic is about taking risks, juxtaposing the raw and refined, mixing high and low, feminine and masculine. The tension of opposites interests me very much.

What are the underlying ideas and principles you hope to communicate through a space?

Design is a constant adventure in exploration. It’s about finding your voice. For me, design means curating individual personality with a balance of high and low, masculine and feminine, size, color, pattern and texture. Hierarchy and scale are so important. The goal should be to curate a cohesive dialogue while still allowing statement pieces to shine.

Kelly Wearstler, Designer | Interview | Travelshopa

There’s a strong global influence in your work. Where are some of the places you’ve been and what have you learnt on these journeys?

Travel is a huge source of inspiration for me. One of my greatest joys as a mother is traveling with my sons, seeing the world through their eyes and exposing them to different cultures and art. Paris is a favorite destination and my must-go for art, culture, shopping and seeking out incredible vintage at flea markets.

What have been your favourite projects that you’ve worked on in the past decade?

Design is storytelling. I approach every project – whether a hotel, a piece of furniture or a collection of fabric – with the same process of exploration and passion. All of my projects hold a special place in my heart as they each play an important part of the evolution of my design story – full of adventure and soul on every scale.

Could you describe your home?

My home was originally built in 1926 as a Spanish Colonial and remodeled around 1934 by architect James E. Dolena. It was formerly owned by Albert R. Broccoli, the producer of the James Bond films. The architecture and history make the house distinctive and it’s fun to know all of the amazing Hollywood personalities that have passed through the halls. We made the home ours with a redesign that included the addition of an atrium and living room off of the kitchen. We wanted an area where our boys could hang out and play while we entertained. My intention was to build upon the story of the home, while still imbuing it with the personality and spirit of our family — a combination of comfort and history.

What does a typical day of work involve for you?

I start every morning with an exercise class then grab a double dry nonfat organic macchiato and drive my sons to school. My day to day at work varies, between meeting with clients, visiting with vendors or designing at the studio. When the work day is done, it’s all about being with my family.

While you’re most celebrated within the interior sphere, you’re also quite the fashion celebrity, even birthing your own fashion line. How do fashion and interiors intersect for you personally?

My love of fashion definitely taught me to treat materiality in a different way. I pay so much attention to the hand of things, the feel and detail of the tailoring. Infusing gemstones, mixed metals and the artisanal sculpture work that is jewelry is a favorite way to imbue a room with depth, character and luxury. It is all alchemy.

Kelly Wearstler, Designer | Interview | Travelshopa
Kelly Wearstler, Designer | Interview | Travelshopa

What has been the biggest milestone in your career?

My first hotel project, The Avalon, which is a boutique hotel in Beverly Hills. On the heels of that project, I designed the Viceroy Santa Monica and went on to design multiple properties for the Viceroy Group around the world along with other boutique and luxury hotel projects.

What are you working on now and what are you looking forward to in the near future?

The studio is such a dynamic place. We always have plenty of new, exciting irons in the fire. I’ve just launched extensive lighting, furniture, fabric and wallcovering collections, along with the recent debut of luxury bedding and a robust stone and tile collection early this year. We’re continually expanding our home décor offerings with authentic and unique artist collaborations. On the interiors side we’re premiering a new hospitality brand with the first residential property slated to open in Hollywood this summer with hotels to follow in Austin and San Francisco over the next two years.

Kelly Wearstler, Designer | Interview | Travelshopa

5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert

5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert | Stylemakers Speak | Travelshopa

Natural and organic beauty has really taken over our beauty cabinets and dressers in recent years, and that’s not about to stop. The reasons to swap your synthetic scent for an organic botanical fragrance are plenty. Botanical fragrances are lush, complex, and morph according to the body chemistry of its wearer; something that perfumes of the synthetic variety can never give us.

Take it from our appointed perfume expert — Alexandra Balahoutis. The visionary botanical perfumer founded Strange Invisible Perfumes in 2000, making a name crafting fragrances formulated from certified organic and hydro-distilled botanical essences. Here, she shares her top tips for falling in love with a new fragrance.

 

Keep a blank canvas

When testing a new perfume, you’ll best be able to fully appreciate each fragrance if you come in with a blank canvas so try to skip strongly-scented lotions, sprays, and even haircare products. This will minimise the possibility of all the scents getting muddled, leading to serious sensory confusion and overload. Scrutinising a fragrance before the alcohol has evaporated and the scent has a chance to settle might prompt you to dismiss a lovely fragrance hastily on the basis that it is too strong. Give it a minute, and don’t spray directly in a way that visibly wets the skin (or tester strip, for that matter). Mist the fragrance and quickly lift the top of your hand into it, letting it fall over the skin. This will be so much more palatable and will mimic the effect of the dry-down.

5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert | Stylemakers Speak | Travelshopa

 

Botanical perfume should be applied generously

Overdo it! Synthetic fragrances are very heavy hitting, but natural ones wear far more subtly. Botanical scents are also somewhat mutable and can smell quite different on each individual blurring the lines between the person and the perfume, whereas synthetic perfumes are much more fixed giving people a much more branded scent. So, if you are wearing something from the duty-free cart, exercise serious caution, but if you opt for a truly botanical fragrance, spritz freely!

5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert | Stylemakers Speak | Travelshopa

 

Apply perfume diffusely, not just on pulse points

This is especially advisable when using botanical perfumes for the reasons mentioned above. Natural fragrances are softer, and so they wear more beautifully when they are applied generously and diffusely. A botanical fragrance will lift better when it is misted generously all over the body rather than just dabbed on the neck and wrists. This makes for a perceptible yet palatable sillage (the degree to which a perfume’s fragrance lingers in the air when worn).

5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert | Stylemakers Speak | Travelshopa
5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert | Stylemakers Speak | Travelshopa

 

Wear different perfumes to suit different moods and occasions

I wake up, wash my face, brush my teeth, throw on a silk robe, and then douse myself in Prima Ballerina. Then I head downstairs and hang out with my French press before taking a shower and beginning the day. The aroma energises me and sparks a feeling of possibility. The rose, sage, lime and botanical musk feel crisp and uplifting, which hits the perfect note for me when I first wake up. After I shower and get dressed, I apply Dimanche or Aries (even though I’m a Virgo). These days I love to wear Love Letter or Black Rosette in the evenings. Perfume is a little like fashion for me. I gravitate toward different looks and scents for different moods and occasions.

5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert | Stylemakers Speak | Travelshopa

 

Assign an intention or purpose to a certain fragrance

Get superstitious…in a fun way. For example, have a collection of perfumes, one that you wear for good luck, another for attraction, and another that makes you feel a bit bolder or more confident. It is also a nice idea to choose a new fragrance when you feel that you’re beginning a new chapter in life, like a new relationship, becoming single, or changing jobs or cities. This is a fun and redolent way to set intentions and to send a clear signal as to what you want.

5 Insider Tips From A Perfume Expert | Stylemakers Speak | Travelshopa

All images courtesy of Strange Invisible Perfumes.

Marco Vedovato, Iter Itineris

 Marco Vedovato, Iter Itineris | Behind The Seams | Travelshopa
 Marco Vedovato, Iter Itineris | Behind The Seams | Travelshopa

 

Designer Marco Vedovato grew up in the ancient Venetian city of Treviso, Italy, which nurtured his eye and sense for nature and design from a young age. His creative and academic pursuits include a Degree in Design and Communication followed by a Postgraduate Masters in Coolhunting and Fashion Design. He also spent a year in Paintings at Accademia Belle Arti in Venice.

Having started his career in graphic design, he ventured down the road of fashion as he saw it as a natural extension of his creativity. Marco worked his way up as a consultant designer for many Italian brands such as The Benetton Group and Cerruti before joining the Armani Group as R&D manager. His natural flair and curiosity for fabric, finishing and product research eventually found expression in his self-styled label, Iter Itineris.

Steeped in understated elegance, the spirit of craftsmanship is manifest in Marco’s attentiveness to Italian semi-tailoring, high quality materials and Japanese fabrics, fused together with unrivalled attention to detail. The label’s thoughtfully designed garments evoke a refined sensibility, while soft and tactile materials draw comfort in the midst of sustaining a modern nomadic lifestyle.

We talked to Marco Vedovato about the impetus to start his label Iter Itineris and how it found his place within the narrative of the ‘modern nomad’.

 


 

What was the most important aspect you envisioned when you were dreaming up Iter Itineris?

There is a massive focus on research. Not many brands similar to our scale would bother to invest in research.

 

You mentioned Japan as a place of huge inspiration for you. How has your time in Japan shaped you as a designer?

I admire the way that Japanese preserve traditions in producing fabrics. Most of them still care for quality over quantity.

 

Can you tell us more about this concept of the modern nomad? What are the requirements of dress for such a lifestyle?

The concept of the modern nomad is just a term I like to use to describe today’s frequent travellers. I want to rehabilitate the term ‘nomad’ in a positive way, especially in this historical moment. While there isn’t a set requirement for this lifestyle, I would prefer to travel with something more comfortable and easy-going. The pieces I design are suitable for any occasion with a focus on functionality for travellers combined with neatness and debonair style.

 

What was the inspiration behind your latest collection?

Robert Capa, the famous war photographer and journalist of the 50’s. The three signature pieces of this collection — the field jacket, raincoat and long paletot – all came from the reinterpretation of the military concept that characterises the iconography of the Hungarian reporter. We’ve also mixed in Japanese elements such as the striped pattern suits and mixed wool and cashmere knitwear, which offer the right blend of warmth and softness.

 

Can you tell us a bit about your creative and design process? 

I usually get inspiration from a painter/photographer/artist/architect/book. The vision I get from that art form or artist, I would then translate into fabric.

 

What does the “Made in Italy” label signify in the Iter Itineris universe?

It is part of our concept because I wanted to mix Japanese fabric and design with Italian fit and production.

 

What does a typical day of work involve for you?

I manage the design, production, and retail teams on a daily basis. Two days a week, I make a point to visit the factories personally to check on production. I firmly believe that the real research is done with the suppliers directly and not just in the office.

 

What are some of the greatest challenges you’ve faced since starting and running Iter Itineris?

Finding the right distribution and building a good team.

 

What do you love most about what you do?

The research – to study and reinterpret with another point of view is the part which I find most fascinating.

 

SHOP THE STORY

Marco Vedovato, Iter Itineris-Travelshopa-15
Marco Vedovato, Iter Itineris-Travelshopa-16
Marco Vedovato, Iter Itineris-Travelshopa-17

If you could go back and do one thing differently at the start of your business, what would it be?

I would open our first shop in Italy instead of Hong Kong.

 

Who are some of the designers and creatives who you think are doing great work?

Paul Harnden and Geoffrey B. Small

 

What are you working on now and what are you looking forward to in the near future?

I am busy designing new fabrics for the FW2017 collection and building a team. I would like to start e-commerce and open a shop in Japan.

 

Iter Itineris

Via Ponte Vetero, 1, Milano, Italy

 

Shop B, 1-1A Sun Street, Wanchai, Hong Kong

(Exit F from Admiralty MTR Station, behind Pacific Place 3)

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